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Research and Innovation Week: Science and Engineering Poster Competition

By Curtin Library 5 October 2017 News & events Research Comments Off on Research and Innovation Week: Science and Engineering Poster Competition

For the second year running, the Library hosted a display of student posters for Curtin’s Research and Innovation Week. The posters were created by Science and Engineering students as part of their research work.

Many of the posters have been displayed at conferences but this was the first opportunity for them to be made available to a wide audience beyond their specific subject area. With over 2 million visits each year the Library is the perfect connector for cross disciplinary research!

The top posters in each school and department were selected for display in the Library during Research and Innovation Week and the best of the best were selected by judges Dr Kate Trinajstic and Dr Mark Hackett. The winners were:

 

1st  Cornelia Wuchter – Environmental drivers shaping flexibility of carbon-utilisation of plants in saline environments

2nd  Ashley Hollings – FTIR Imaging of Lipid Homeostatis in brain white matter during accelerated aging and onset of dementia

3rd Chenoa Tremblay – Searching for Molecules at 100MHz with the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA)

 

Highly Commended:

Erin Smith – Synthesis of pyrifenox derivatives for the treatment of Chagas disease
Carla de Thomas – Interatomic potentials for carbon – transferability, practicalities and validation

 

First prize:

Research Week 2017 Poster Winners 022

Cornelia Wuchter and co-author Sebastian Stanley

Cornelia Wuchter – Environmental drivers shaping flexibility of carbon-utilisation of plants in saline environments.

“Birridas, salt-laden clay pans of the Shark Bay region of Western Australia, offer a unique model to analyse the influence of ambient salinity and temperature stress on plants. In this project we study the carbon isotopic fractionation pattern from plants that grow in the Birridas along an environmental salinity gradient. Furthermore, we analyse the distribution of plant stomata density. Stomata are openings in the plant epidermis that are responsible for gas and water vapour exchange. Results from this study will improve our understanding of the physiological and morphological adaptation of plants to environmental salinity and heat stress.”

Second prize:

Research Week 2017 Poster Winners ashley

Ashley Hollings and her digital poster

Ashley Hollings – FTIR Imaging of Lipid Homeostatis in brain white matter during accelerated aging and onset of dementia.

“Alzheimer’s disease is a significant health and economical concern and there is the potential for bio-spectroscopic imaging to play a role in further investigating its mechanisms and characteristics. In a previous study carried out by Mark Hackett and Rebecca Tidy,  it was determined using Fourier Transform Infrared microscopy (FTIRM), that there was decreased lipid content in the hippocampus (key brain region associated with learning and memory) of a dementia mouse model compared to a control. The project displayed in the poster investigated whether the same trends were seen in other brain regions such as the cerebellum, corpus callosum and striatum using the same technique. The results showed that the hippocampus was most vulnerable with smaller alterations often not statistically significant observed in the other regions. I then used Raman spectroscopy, a complementary technique that can provide higher spatial resolution, to further investigate the cellular and sub-cellular location of these lipid alterations.”

Third prize:

chenoa

Chenoa Tremblay

Chenoa Tremblay – Searching for Molecules at 100MHz with the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA)

“I have used the Murchison Widefield Array, located in the outback of Western Australia, to look for molecules contained in dust, gas and stars within the centre of our Galaxy.  In this first survey we have tentatively detected the molecules nitric oxide (NO) and the mecapto radical (SH) in stars that are far into their lifecycle.”  https://www.icrar.org/hunting-molecules/

Highly Commended:

highly commended

Poster entered by Erin Smith

Erin Smith  – Synthesis of pyrifenox derivatives for the treatment of Chagas disease

“Pyrifenox is a potential drug candidate for the treatment of Chagas disease – a disease which is caused by a parasite and affects approximately 16-18 million people. A new modular synthesis was established to make pyrifenox and its analogues. These analogues lead to the discovery of compounds that inhibited the causative parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, at the nanomolar range and the discovery of a new class of compound for the potential treatment of Chagas disease.”

highly commended 2

Poster entered by Carla de Thomas and friend

Carla de Thomas – Interatomic potentials for carbon – transferability, practicalities and validation

 

 

 

 

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