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Read and Publish Agreements – making Curtin research freely available to the world

By Curtin Library 20 October 2021 News & events No Comments »
Group photo

Dr Hendra Gunosewoyo, Catherine Clark (University Librarian) and Dr Alan Payne, showing their support for Open Access.

Traditionally, libraries pay a lot of money for books and journal subscriptions which allow students and scholars to read the world’s latest research. But if you don’t have a subscription, you can’t access the research, even if it was funded by public money from government grants.

In recent years, many publishers have moved towards making journal articles and books openly available, meaning that anyone can access the research as long as they have an internet connection. But this is often achieved by publishers charging authors a “processing fee” to cover their publication costs. So we have ended up with a situation in which both libraries AND authors are paying publishers.

In response to this, funders are increasingly insisting that all research paid for by them is made open and free immediately on publication. To accelerate the uptake of Open Access publishing the transformative agreement has emerged, one form of which is the “Read and Publish Agreement”. This is a negotiated agreement between a publisher and an institution for access to journal content – the library continues to pay a subscription, but the cost also covers open access publishing by the institution’s researchers.

In Australia, the Council of Australian University Librarians (CAUL) has been negotiating with a range of publishers to effect these agreements and Curtin authors are now able to publish Open Access (OA) with CSIRO, The Royal Society and Karger.

The very first article by Curtin authors to be made OA under this new arrangement was a paper by Curtin PhD student Alexander Hamilton, his supervisor Dr Hendra Gunosewoyo (Senior Lecturer, Curtin Medical School) and co-authors Dr Alan Payne (Senior Lecturer, School of Molecular and Life Sciences) and Professor Mauro Mocerino (Professor, School of Molecular and Life Sciences). Thanks to the Library’s commitment to read and publish agreements anyone in the world can read the article Imaging Cannabinoid Receptors: A Brief Collection of Covalent and Fluorescent Probes for CB1 and CB2 Receptors.

Alex and Hendra

Alexander Hamilton and his supervisor Dr Hendra Gunosewoyo

Asked about the process required to make their article open, Dr Gunosewoyo said:

“We are fortunate to be the very first Curtin authors to take advantage of the Open Access agreement between CSIRO and Curtin. The process was refreshingly straightforward and the editorial assistance from CSIRO Australian Journal of Chemistry was second to none. We are grateful to be part of the Curtin’s Read and Publish agreements currently existing for CSIRO, Royal Society and Karger. If resources allow, we think it would be a fantastic opportunity for Curtin to expand this Open Access base with future publishers sharing similar spirit.”

The good news is that some major publishers will be coming on board in 2022, giving Curtin authors access to fee-free OA publishing options in a wide range of journals across many disciplines.

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Walking the walk: Creative Commons licensing on our learning materials

By Curtin Library 20 October 2021 News & events No Comments »

UniSkills

As we advocate for openness in learning, teaching and research, we also want to make our own materials easy to reuse and share.

Central to the approach of the recently launched UniSkills site was a desire to make our online study support materials more open.

Our study, research, and assignment skills guides have always been free to read on the internet; however, our original website content did not explicitly permit people to reuse our content, which runs contrary to our work to make information open and accessible to as many people as possible.

We often received requests from other institutions asking for permission to reuse our online content, and we wanted to signal that we welcomed this and make the guidelines for doing so transparent. The obvious answer was to assign a Creative Commons (CC) license to the content, effectively making our learning materials Open Educational Resources (OERs).

Our Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 4.0 Licence (CC BY-SA 4.0) allows anyone to copy, re-use, share, and adapt our content without requiring additional permissions. Open Access begins with free and unfettered access to information but that’s only the first step – assigning CC licenses allow users to move beyond access, providing guidelines for further use. For UniSkills, we selected a licence that ensures that any outputs derived from the original content are open as well.

As we continue to develop the UniSkills platform, we want to provide greater access to files and code in easily editable formats to further facilitate adaptation and re-use.

We are committed to continuing down the open access road, as far as we can travel!

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Celebrating International Open Access Week 2021

By Curtin Library 20 October 2021 News & events No Comments »

Merchandise picture

International Open Access (OA) Week is being held October 25-31 this year and the theme is “It Matters How We Open Knowledge: Building Structural Equity”. This theme aligns with the recently released UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science which aims to make scholarship more transparent, more accessible, more equitable, and more inclusive.

Advocacy for the adoption of open and practices in learning, teaching and research is a core activity set out in the Library’s 2021-2025 Strategic Direction. To commemorate OA Week, Curtin Library has launched a new Open Research webpage which:

  • Describes how Curtin Library supports researchers with OA and FAIR;
  • Provides three handouts targeted at different audiences on individual actions that may be taken to realise the benefits of OA – the handouts are for researchers, HDR supervisors, and a general message for our students and learning and teaching staff;
  • Showcases OA stories generated from liaison work between the Faculty Librarians and Curtin researchers. These tell the story of successful OA experiences to inspire others to adopt open and FAIR practices.

We are calling this week-long campaign an “OA Takeover” as OA messaging will be conveyed on all of our social media channels and webpages for the week. For those of you meeting with Library staff you may also see that we are physically wearing OA as a brand with “I support open access” lanyards and badges. Similar to our ORCID promotional campaign, we are giving away OA mugs to researchers who contribute their OA stories.

Apart from advocating for OA and FAIR, the week gives the Library the opportunity to give our promotional and educational materials on this topic a refresh as well as remind Library staff of our mission as “Open Access ambassadors”.

Check out our Open Research website to read more about our resources and support available.

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Open Access stories: Dr Martin Whitely and Professor John Phillimore

By Curtin Library 20 October 2021 News & events No Comments »
John Phillimore pictured left.

Professor John Phillimore and Dr Martin Whitely

Dr Martin Whitely (Research Fellow) and Professor John Phillimore (Executive Director) of the John Curtin Institute of Public Policy at Curtin published their research findings that the youngest children in a school year were more likely to be diagnosed and prescribed medication for ADHD, raising questions around immaturity being mistaken for ADHD.

Their Open Access short note in the Medical Journal of Australia won Curtin’s most newsworthy academic article award. The authors then arranged to pay an Article Processing Fee to make a follow-up systematic review in the Wiley Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry also available open access for anyone to read.

Backed up with global media and social media promotion, lots of attention was generated in the form of syndicated news stories, requests for radio and TV interviews and social media attention. Their article was picked up by the Wall Street Journal and received 40,000 hits on Reddit’s science section. This put their article in the top 0.05% of all outputs ever tracked by Altmetric Explorer, reaching an estimated 5.3 million people.

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Open Access stories: Professor Lucy Montgomery

By Curtin Library 20 October 2021 News & events No Comments »

Lucy M 2b

Professor Lucy Montgomery, Professor of Knowledge Innovation, Centre for Culture and Technology shares her experience with Open Access:

“In 2021 our collaboratively authored book “Open Knowledge Institutions: Reinventing Universities” was published as a fully OA book by MIT Press.

The publication of our book in a fully OA digital format, as well as in traditional paperback format, was the culmination of an exciting process of collaboration with MIT Press – which included open community peer review, traditional peer review, and eventual OA publication.

Our book makes a case for Open Access as a powerful mechanism for breaking down barriers to access and use of the knowledge made within universities. Given its topic, we felt that it was extremely important to work with a publisher to ensure that the book itself was OA.

Being able to share our work with anyone who is interested in it, regardless of whether they can afford to pay for a copy, has been a wonderful experience. We have particularly enjoyed being able to share a link to the full text version of the book via Twitter, as well as in emails to people who we hope will find the ideas valuable. The fact that people can access the book with a single click, without paywalls, means that we have been able to engage in a conversation with a community of readers in a way that would simply not have been possible if we had published our work as a closed book.”

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Open Access stories: Dr Hendra Gunosewoyo

By Curtin Library 20 October 2021 News & events No Comments »

Hendra crop

The first article by Curtin authors to be made Open Access under the Library read and publish arrangements was by Curtin PhD student Alexander Hamilton, his supervisor Dr Hendra Gunosewoyo (Senior Lecturer, Curtin Medical School) and co-authors Dr Alan Payne (Senior Lecturer, School of Molecular and Life Sciences) and Professor Mauro Mocerino (Professor, School of Molecular and Life Sciences).

Alexander Hamilton and his supervisor Dr Hendra Gunosewoyo

Alexander Hamilton and his supervisor Dr Hendra Gunosewoyo

Asked about the process required to make their article open, Dr Gunosewoyo said:

“We are fortunate to be the very first Curtin authors to take advantage of the Open Access agreement between CSIRO and Curtin. …The process was refreshingly straightforward and the editorial assistance from CSIRO Australian Journal of Chemistry was second to none. We are grateful to be part of the Curtin’s Read and Publish agreements currently existing for CSIRO, Royal Society and Karger. If resources allow, we think it would be a fantastic opportunity for Curtin to expand this Open Access base with future publishers sharing similar spirit.”

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Open Access stories: Professor Steven Tingay

By Curtin Library 20 October 2021 News & events No Comments »

Steven-Tingay cropped

Professor Steven Tingay, Executive Director, Curtin Institute of Radio Astronomy shares his experience with Open Access:

“In astronomy, and several other disciplines, Open Access is significantly boosted by the existence of arXiv, a large-scale repository for pre-prints. These are generally the versions of papers accepted for publication by journals. Further, astronomers have produced the Astrophysics Data Service (ADS), which indexes all journals and arXiv (more comprehensively than proprietary commercial index services). ADS also generates comprehensive bibliometrics information. These services greatly increase the visibility and accessibility of my work and the work of my team.

For example, ADS produces a daily digest of all papers indexed over the last 24 hours and sends it via email to thousands of astronomers world-wide. When my papers appear they are automatically disseminated widely. Of course, I also get to see what everyone around the world is publishing every day. This has led me to reach out to researchers with interesting papers, which has resulted in some of my most productive collaborations. The digest leads to an interesting effect – the papers are only given an ADS link, so we look at these lists of publications blind to the destination journal. This reduces effects such as journal bias.”

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Improving electronic resource access for students

By Curtin Library 27 August 2021 News & events Comments off

CL009When the Library is notified of new books to be included in student reading lists we routinely purchase them in electronic versions whenever possible. This has been the case for some time and helps ensure that texts are available to the greatest possible number of students and that distance is no barrier to access.

However, this in itself does not guarantee that all books on reading lists are actually ebooks. Sometimes electronic versions were not available at the time the reading lists were created and therefore print versions were purchased instead.

During the COVID lockdown of early 2020 it became critical that students could access reading list material online since physical libraries were closed. Accordingly, we quickly reviewed our provision of textbooks and were able to supplement print copies with a significant number of texts newly available in electronic format.

But, of course, reading lists are not just about textbooks. In 2021 the Library Collections Team started an initiative to review active reading lists to make sure that that all book content was made available electronically whenever it was possible for us to do so. We also wanted to establish a methodology so that reading lists were checked regularly to ensure that the print-only component was kept to a minimum.

When we began to look at how we would identify which titles lacked electronic versions in our catalogue and which of these had electronic versions that we could purchase, it rapidly became clear that this was not a simple task using the reports that we had available. Our existing methods meant that we would have needed to cross check reports from the Leganto reading list system against the Library catalogue and against the databases of our book suppliers.

Luckily, our library system vendor, ProQuest-Ex Libris, came to our aid. We had recently implemented the Rialto Marketplace, which integrates the ProQuest book purchasing platform into the acquisitions workflow within the Alma library system. Since Leganto is also integrated into Alma, ProQuest were easily able to use their internal systems to run a report both to identify where we did not have an ebook version, and to inform us of what options were available for us to purchase one.

As a result of this process we were able to acquire an additional 293 titles which were referenced by 417 reading list citations (some books were on multiple reading lists).  These were then added into the reading lists themselves by Collections Team staff, and are also, of course, available for future reuse. The cost of this exercise was around $135,000 – money well spent on ensuring that students have easy access to the reading they need for their studies.

And importantly, the ProQuest report can be rerun regularly so that ebook availability is always kept up to date.

 
Written by David Wells
Manager, Collections

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Meet our Kalgoorlie staff – Teresa and Greta

By Curtin Library 26 August 2021 News & events Comments off

Staff at Kalgoorlie open day

We’re proud to have our Curtin Kalgoorlie campus and library, located 7 hours drive east of Perth. Teresa Bennett and Greta Vos are our trusty librarians supporting our Kalgoorlie students and staff. We spoke to them to find out some of the unique rewards and challenges of operating a regional university library.

Hi Teresa and Greta, could you please describe your roles? What does a day in the life of a Kalgoorlie librarian look like?

Teresa: My role is the Coordinator, Curtin Connect & Library, which means I spend time looking after both student services and the Library.

Generally my days start off quiet as the first class on campus is at 8:00am. I’ll turn everything on in the building and log into the PCs.

Greta: Yes – we’ll generally start together on the library enquiries desk together before the Library Student Assistants and Curtin Connect Advisors arrive.

Teresa: During the day I’ll walk around the library to check on the students and make sure our COVID-19 rules in place are being adhered to by staff and students. Lots of things come up during the day, such as circulation issues and desk issues. We do lots of work supporting students via information literacy classes and one-on-one training. I am also on-call for local in-depth EndNote or database questions.

Greta: I’m on hand to assist students with their questions; usually regarding the catalogue and the different library services that we provide like printing, student card access, referencing and EndNote assistance. I also support WASM staff with these issues when required.

Teresa: We also regularly meet with both Perth staff and Kalgoorlie staff, this usually takes up a few hours of the day. The Library is a hive of activity in the afternoon and early evening.

Before leaving for the day I liaise with security with any issues they need to know as they are on campus until the library closes at midnight.

Going home doesn’t take long – only four minutes, or one song on Triple J!

Greta Vos

Greta Vos

How does your previous work experience inform your work here at the Library?

Greta: I started at Kalgoorlie Library this year and this is my first job in a library. My previous experience was in administration and customer service roles where I interacted with a range of different people. These roles included supporting and assisting newly arrived refugees settling within Australia; working within in a university environment assisting both academics and PhD students; and finally in the logistics and transport industry liaising with mining companies and suppliers.

Teresa: Previously I worked at a public library, a special library at a mining company and an education district office resource centre.

The work experience at the mining company gave me a good grounding in mining terms, and the process of mining. I was responsible for standards, the library and the company report depository.

There were also lot of historical documents from mining on the Golden Mile held by the company. This gave me a headstart in the business of mining and mining engineering, which helps me support students on this campus studying mining and metallurgical engineering and related subjects.

Working at the education department gave me good experience in dealing with academics and school staff and the approaches to teaching and learning.

Teresa Bennett

Teresa Bennett

Are there any particular challenges and rewards of working at a regional campus you’d like to highlight?

Teresa: One of the rewards of working on a smaller campus is the breadth of tasks that staff here cover, everyone working across teams to help each other and help our clients.

Team building is also good on a regional campus. In many activities planned for students, staff are invited to participate which makes for better relationships between the Curtin Student Guild, students and staff.

Greta: One of the more rewarding aspects of working at a regional campus is the opportunity to better know the students. It makes it much easier to find out what they need. It also helps us adapt our resources and programs to help make their time at Curtin Kalgoorlie fulfilling and productive.

Another bonus is the abundance of parking and no parking fees!

Teresa: The challenges are always communication and keeping the communication lines open, both with library staff at the Perth campus and Faculty of Science and Engineering staff located at Kalgoorlie.

Greta: The more challenging aspect I forgot before moving here was that it takes forever for online shopping to arrive!

How does your team help the University achieve its goals?

Teresa: The library supports Curtin students and staff in their study, learning and teaching, which helps them to achieve their goals. By supporting students and staff, we are helping the University achieve its goals.

Greta: Agreed! Our aim at Kalgoorlie is to develop new ways to provide resources and services to both staff and students. We also work closely with the Perth campus to support online services and workshops, continually looking at ways to meet the needs of our students – particularly in the quickly changing online environment due to COVID.

What are your work goals for the year? What big projects are coming up?

Greta: One of our big projects for the year is establishing and promoting our Makerspace that caters specifically to the creative and learning needs of our Curtin Kalgoorlie students. It also allows students to spend time de-stressing and chatting with other students or staff.

Teresa: My work goals this year consisted of employing and training a new Librarian – thanks Greta! – and creating a more cohesive team, with the Curtin Connect Staff who share our space in the Kalgoorlie Library. So far it’s going well!

 

Edited by Sara Culverhouse
Communications Officer

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Thesis Fest

By Curtin Library 25 August 2021 News & events Comments off

Presenter giving a lecture at Thesis Fest

Being a PhD student is often referred to as being on a journey, and in many cases a very lonely journey. The Library works closely with Curtin University PhD and Masters by Research students (HDRs) to support them with the skills and resources they need to complete their thesis. However there are still students who struggle, with COVID adding another layer of complexity and challenge for many of them.

The idea of running a two-day support workshop for PhD students was pitched by the Faculty Librarian team for last year’s Library Innovation Initiative and was judged the winning idea by Library staff. Using faculty contacts and suggestions from staff across the University, “Thesis Fest” was planned as a support event focusing not just on skills but also on wellness and mental health. It was successfully delivered over two days on June 21 and June 22, 2021 with approximately 65 HDR students attending in-person and 50 online. With exquisite timing – the event took place the week before WA had a snap lockdown.

The aim of Thesis Fest was to celebrate the HDR journey, motivate and inspire students, have fun, develop networks, meet other students, and learn from each other and some amazing speakers. Our keynote speaker Professor Inger Mewburn, also known as The Thesis Whisperer, beamed in from Canberra and shared her wisdom on academic writing in COVID times. Professor Julia Richardson reframed the HDR journey as a quest – complete with monsters to slay and a suitable reward at the finish.  We had Jack Geraghty from the Student Wellbeing Advisory Service showing us how to focus on the small steps to get to the bigger picture.  A courageous Professor Sharon Parker fronted the “Ask the Professor anything” session which sparked many questions and answers. We also welcomed inspirational presentation skills coach Peter Dhu who spoke about overcoming the fear of public speaking for milestone presentations. These were just to name a few of our diverse line-up of presenters!

Students at Thesis Fest

Students were encouraged to submit a poster about themselves and about their research prior to attending. The aim of our poster wall was to connect students with like-minded peers to help them establish or expand their networks.

To keep up the excitement on the day we offered daily door prizes with fierce competition for The Thesis Whisperer’s books. One student tried to buy a copy of the book only to find it sold out.  She won a copy the next day!

Feedback from the event was overwhelmingly positive from students, staff and faculties, many of whom are keen to continue the support measures begun at Thesis Fest. The overall message we received from student feedback was that they felt reenergised and motivated to get back to their research and complete their PhD:

Just want to say I’m so pleased to be here, I am astonished with the details, the student posters, meeting the professionals and your smiling faces.  I can say this is one of the best events I have ever attended at Curtin

 

Written by Diana Blackwood, Jenny Copestake, Kitty Delaney, Linden Hall, Jaya Ralph and Vanessa Varis
Faculty Librarians

Janice Chan
Coordinator, Research Services

Petra Dumbell
Academic Skills Advisor

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